pet-organization-won’t-return-dog-to-family

Pet organization won’t return dog to family

Lifestyle

A metro family came back from vacation to find their dog had been taken away. Harrison belongs to the Essary family in Altoona, but now they don’t know where he is. Amber Essary said they left Harrison with Max Garcia, a trainer from Paws and Effect, which is a nonprofit training service in Des Moines. When they came back from a brief Christmas vacation, Garcia told the Essary family that their dog was gone. “Saturday when we went to pick him up, he opened the door and let my daughter know that he didn’t have our dog and that it was out of his hands,” Amber Essary said. Their daughter, 16-year-old Abiola Doyeni, depends on her dog Harrison to help with medical complications, anxiety and depression. According to Amber Essary, without the dog she has been going to behavioral health care frequently and has made multiple trips to the emergency room.Paws and Effect Executive Director Nicole Shumate said her dog training service revoked the Essary’s adoption of Harrison. She cited a Facebook comment where Amber Essary said she “may have a 2-year-old to rehome.”But that comment happened months ago, and the Essary family continued to take Harrison to Paws and Effect for training without issue. Shumate also claimed the dog was overweight, weighing 101 pounds, unable to get up from a lying position or sit down. “It needs assistance to get up on its own feet. It cannot sit. It just does not have enough space between its abdomen and its legs to sit. It struggles to walk on its own,” Shumate said. The Essary family disputed their dog was in such condition. Paws and Effect provided no additional video, pictures or documentation to KCCI regarding Harrison’s weight or medical condition.Shumate claimed the reason her organization was able to revoke the adoption of Harrison was because of an agreement with Puppies for Parole in Missouri, a program Harrison was once in.”There’s a partnership between Paws and Effect and Puppies for Patrol,” Shumate said. “The coordination of our being able to bring dogs in from out of state means we become responsible for that dog’s welfare.” KCCI contacted Puppies for Patrol and they provided an email saying they have no control over dogs once they’re out of their care. Shumate later claimed she exercised a waiver, written into Paws and Effect’s service agreement that allows the nonprofit to confiscate an animal if they feel it needs to be removed from its home due to concerns over its wellbeing. Though she didn’t provide KCCI with any documentation of a signed agreement. The Essary family hired a lawyer and is pursuing legal action against Paws and Effect. They said according to Iowa law, their dog was stolen. “I’m really confused about where the dog is. Why the dog isn’t in our home and how we will get him back,” Amber Essary said.

ALTOONA, Iowa —

A metro family came back from vacation to find their dog had been taken away.

Harrison belongs to the Essary family in Altoona, but now they don’t know where he is.

Amber Essary said they left Harrison with Max Garcia, a trainer from Paws and Effect, which is a nonprofit training service in Des Moines.

When they came back from a brief Christmas vacation, Garcia told the Essary family that their dog was gone.

“Saturday when we went to pick him up, he opened the door and let my daughter know that he didn’t have our dog and that it was out of his hands,” Amber Essary said.

Their daughter, 16-year-old Abiola Doyeni, depends on her dog Harrison to help with medical complications, anxiety and depression.

According to Amber Essary, without the dog she has been going to behavioral health care frequently and has made multiple trips to the emergency room.

Paws and Effect Executive Director Nicole Shumate said her dog training service revoked the Essary’s adoption of Harrison. She cited a Facebook comment where Amber Essary said she “may have a 2-year-old to rehome.”

But that comment happened months ago, and the Essary family continued to take Harrison to Paws and Effect for training without issue.

Shumate also claimed the dog was overweight, weighing 101 pounds, unable to get up from a lying position or sit down.

“It needs assistance to get up on its own feet. It cannot sit. It just does not have enough space between its abdomen and its legs to sit. It struggles to walk on its own,” Shumate said.

The Essary family disputed their dog was in such condition. Paws and Effect provided no additional video, pictures or documentation to KCCI regarding Harrison’s weight or medical condition.

Shumate claimed the reason her organization was able to revoke the adoption of Harrison was because of an agreement with Puppies for Parole in Missouri, a program Harrison was once in.

“There’s a partnership between Paws and Effect and Puppies for Patrol,” Shumate said. “The coordination of our being able to bring dogs in from out of state means we become responsible for that dog’s welfare.”

KCCI contacted Puppies for Patrol and they provided an email saying they have no control over dogs once they’re out of their care.

Shumate later claimed she exercised a waiver, written into Paws and Effect’s service agreement that allows the nonprofit to confiscate an animal if they feel it needs to be removed from its home due to concerns over its wellbeing. Though she didn’t provide KCCI with any documentation of a signed agreement.

The Essary family hired a lawyer and is pursuing legal action against Paws and Effect. They said according to Iowa law, their dog was stolen.

“I’m really confused about where the dog is. Why the dog isn’t in our home and how we will get him back,” Amber Essary said.